How to use Luck as a multiplier to achieve your goals



Most anytime someone is talking about luck it catches my attention. As a casino guy for much of my life, luck has always been a topic that gets its fair share of the focus.

I was reading through my Aeon feed the other day and this 5 min video titled Science doesn't rely on luck, but success in science can't-do without it was making a case for luck in science. From the way I read the research information, their findings can also be used in most of your everyday endeavors toward success.

"When the timing of productivity was removed, the research revealed that impact in a scientist’s career is random, and not correlated to experience. In short, success is a complex function of ability, productivity, and luck."

Here is the formula that the researchers came up with to predict success.

C = P x Q
impact = luck * individual ability

The provided recipe for success is an interesting way of looking at luck's part to play, and I find it to be true in my gaming experiences. The luckiest players are always the ones that are bellied up to the table. Just as the luckiest fishermen are the ones that have their line in the water and the luckiest golfers are the ones that are always hitting the ball straight towards the hole.

Remember Louis Pasteur's famous quote "Fortune favours the prepared mind."? Luck turns out to be the multiplier you need moving forward. Luck makes the difference when combined with your individual talents, and when you combine your skills with time, you'll be the one who benefits from the multiplication factor of luck.

You never know what the next roll of the dice will produce, so be ready to take advantage when a lucky chance might look your way.

Original Research Article at sciencemag.org



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